Subject Description How can a few pounds of soggy grey matter give rise to the sensational…

Subject Description How can a few pounds of soggy grey matter give rise to the sensational world of our conscious experience? Where do minds begin and end? Do experiments in neuroscience show we lack free will? Is it possible for intentions to cause actions? How do we understand others in everyday life? We will explore and evaluate possible answers to these questions to better understand the most distinctive features of minds. Course Learning Outcomes Course Learning Outcomes can be found in the Course Handbook. Students should refer to the Handbook pertaining to the year of their commencement and the course in which they are enrolled. Subject Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to: Subject Learning Outcomes 1. Use basic concepts and ideas relevant to major theories and approaches in the philosophy of mind; 2. Demonstrate an understanding of central topics in the philosophy of mind; 3. Critically analyse arguments and theories in the philosophy of mind; 4. Evaluate and produce cogent arguments orally and in writing; 5. Demonstrate an understanding of alternative viewpoints in discussion with peers. Student Workload Students should note that UOW policy equates 1 credit point with 2 hours of study per week, including lectures and tutorials/workshops/practicals, self-directed study and work no assessment tasks. For example, in a 6 credit point subject, a total of 12 hours of study per week is expected. Subject Changes and Response to Student Feedback 2018 No substantive changes have been made to the subject. Dr. Michael D. Kirchhoff Extraordinary Changes to the Subject Outline In extraordinary circumstances the provisions stipulated in this Subject Outline may require amendment after the Subject Outline has been distributed. All students enrolled in the subject must be notified and have the opportunity to provide feedback in relation to the proposed amendment, prior to the amendment being finalised. Learning Analytics “Where Learning Analytics data (such as student engagement with Moodle, access to recorded lectures, University Library usage, task marks, and use of SOLS) is available to the Subject Coordinator, this may be used to assist in analysing student engagement, and to identify and recommend support to students who may be at risk of failure. If you have questions about the kinds of data the University uses, how we collect it, and how we protect your privacy in the use of this data, please refer to https://www.uow.edu.au/about/privacy/index.html.”

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